We can’t say enough about the beautiful coast of Cornwall and Devon. But then we arrived in the Scilly isles with pure water, seaweed low tides and silky sand we thought we were back in the West Indies. So many islands to explore here, 30 miles off lands end- UK s most western point.

All the islands have paths that go round and criss cross each other. Of course it was surprising to pass in front of people kitchen windows but that is what they do.

Most islands do not have cars. Everyone has splendid gardens and veggies for sale.

The many fishermen provide for the islands and mainland. Most all the houses were thick stone with slate roofs. Winters might be tough here as you know everyone and the weather limits your activity’s

On st Martins I found a charity shop shack stacked full with UK Country Living magazines.

On Tresco we explored Cromwell forts and Iron Age burial sites.

On St Mary’s we took some hot much needed showers and wandered thru the star fort.

This is a GOTTA GO place to sail!

They caught our short lines. Made fast my uncleated breast line. Frantically pulling in tiger maru who was running down currant on a pontoon in the harbor entrance of Douarnenez. We were tired from our crossing and the Ushant shipping lane that crossed the Brittany coast and English Channel. Thanks to david and Christina we arrived safely, attached to land or at least a pontoon.

They hail from the fabulous port town of Mevagissey which we couldn’t anchor off because the wind wasn’t right. There’s is a traditional gaff yawl built in Martha’s Vinyard by Ashley Butler and sailed home to the UK .

David bought her. Crossed the Atlantic single handed two times-in that same year. Spent three days in the azores, a few weeks in Antigua for the classics and a few nights on some other islands. Basically he does it for the freedom of sailing alone offshore. He is really the last of true adventurers, setting his oil lamps at night for his running lights, using his sextant for positions and carrying all those sails to be hanked on and off . Christina is the last of the last also – who supports his passion and does not dare get in his way, rather assists him with weather from onshore. She really gets the passion of mad single handed sailor.

The flush deck no cockpit boat must be hard to sail in the weather that dominates the uk. It must be miserable in boarding seas. Actually the only place I would want to sail her is in the tropics with cushions on deck and awnings spread above. Much like how David Wegman set up his flush deck cow horn Afriggan Queen who sailed the world the trade winds route.( now gone due to hurricane Irma) David from mevigissey is clearly different and as he says “has to do it the hard way”.

David’s work shop the crown jewel of the innards of the boat. Look at all those storage spots and space for making, fixing & navigation.

sally b is for sale but David keeps her moving. For him it is a way of life and he can’t seem to get enough. Interested? What’s his email? Gonna find out.

When we came in from our Atlantic crossing this is where we first landed. It’s the perfect protected spot. When you get the energy to pump up your dingy and ride ashore, you are greeted by two pubs, plenty of drink and usually a warm fire. Mostly second homes litter this beautiful snug harbour. A short walk out of town past the 1904 school house takes you to a sandy beach with wild flowers and fern abound. 

Castle town bear is a small port but is irelands second most important fishing port. We anchored snugly in the harbour and spent three days walking town, Dunboy castle and the back roads of town. We never found the stone circle. People here were super friendly and have a great love for there surroundings. We met several ex pats that felt the very same way. A cheese maker who set up a farm and made cheese said it was the best part of Ireland. The crepe maker, from Germany had the same to say about his neck of the woods. 

On we went to Glengarif , a sheltered bay at the end of Bantry Bay. This is a gardeners delight and there are three garden tours to be taken. One being the bamboo gardens, the town gardens and the Italian gardens on one of the islands. We chose to hike to the national park and hike old carriage roads and scramble up rock outcrops. I most enjoyed the coffee caravan that housed an indoor reading nook filled with surf and seaside books.

Plenty to do here in Kinsale. The yacht club is most excellent with showers, laundry and great food. The people here are really genuine. On our first days travel I met a gypsy who settled down to raise horses, an ex real estate salesmen who sold out and became a fisherman, and a young man who returned home to roast coffee beans in an old warehouse. Although Kinsale is a tourist town with plenty of bus loads of people it still has its characters.
A short walk out of town takes you stone throw from people s windows and through there gardens up stilly walk towards the fort. I enjoyed this walk emmensly as I was able to admire people’s building styles and garden idea.s.

Back in town I spent time at local library which has enough local books to get a gist of Ireland. I ventured up hill to the cork design building where I purchased a marbled blank book, wooden garden dibble and garden tools all made locally.

The grocery store, tucked in the back corner had everything one could want all crammed into a small space but bustling with fresh bread, sweats and local caught fish. The back streets have bookshops, used and new and plenty of coffee and tea shops. This is a great place to spend a week. 

  • First we found rotten wood under the teak decks on the port side. This project set us back a full month in our schuduled departure date for the crossing. A bit stressful as we had crew and hurricane season approaching. 
  • Waiting an extra day in Provincetown to finish shopping and fueling up cost us 5 long days at sea motoring. We should have jumped on that lumpy ass low but there was still so much to do .Because we only carry    40 Gallons of fuel we had to head into St. John’s newfoundland with out charts. We were able to do it when Julien found a navonics chart downloaded four years prior still on his iPad!!!! I found it rediculious as Julien had sailed around engineless before I came into the picture. It was an ocean we were crossing with no obstructions. Oh well captains orders. 
  • Captain Julien hits a weather buoy along the coastline of St. John in fog with the auto helm on and the engine blasting. Who auto helms into a new place with out charts and in fog? We found out a day later that we passed a tanker size ice burg . 
  • our prevented main does a jib in a building brisk wind with the Aires steering and breaks the wooden boom. Two days of repairs during 2o – 25 knot winds with out a main and we are back at it waiting for the next low to bring us heavy 30-35 knot winds. Let’s hope the boom holds out. He slyly repaired it with a 2 by 4 scarf in three spots, west system and several large hose clamps. 
  • Tomorrow is half way day and I have been told to keep the captain crunch cereal at bay until we are tied up at a dock.  Captains orders.

After two months of determined work we are almost ready to hit the high sea. It has been a long time dream for both Julien and I to cross the pond in our own boat. Little did I know the amount of energy it would consume. I am tired, frazzled & worn. To view our journey by tracking latitude and longitude goto https://forecast.predictwind.com/tracking/display/TigerMaru

Two months prior to leaving , Julien was putting in some structural beams and found rot in the deck. Here we are replacing the port deck without fastening. Up came the old teak. A bit of scarfed wood went in and then some fiberglass. On top of that we g flexed new teak wood clamped down with bolted down cantaleviered 2 by 2 . We then wedged the teak as we went. We also used .155 inch weed whacker cord as a bond breaker between the caulk and bottom.  It was difficult to work with. Next we pulled the clamps off and finished the deck with black roofing pl bought at Home Depot. I found it easier to apply and less air bubbles then teak deck system. It also only cost $5 a tube. We had previously tested it seven years

We also installed an inner stay to hang a storm jib on. Running backs so the mast won’t pump. I have just finished sewing 116 drogue cones with the help of Michele, Julien daughter and crew. We deliberated about how to get weather out at sea and finally came up with predict winds offshore weather and an iridium go. Michelle has been setting it up and soon we will be able to receive weather and get texts and email as well as calls. Our Eperb, Winslow life raft and spin lock PDF were bought at landfall navigation in Stamford conniticut. We will use C- Map on the iPad for charts of Western Europe as we don’t know where we will land. Once I pay the $40 I can download them for keeps. This is very scary for us as we are paper chart people. I will let you know how iPad navigation works out for us,

Dinner Guest- Joe Carini

Wicky is a true crafts lady in her writing and in living life. Joe my brother is an artist in all walks of life- his rugs are amazingly alive! wwww.carinilang.com

Wickham Boyle: Writer, Blogger, Dreamer and all around capable person

*published in Aspire Metro Magazine on 29 July 2015

Sought after for their artistic design, elegant materials and traditional hand weaving methods rarely utilized in modern carpet making, Carini Lang’s carpets grace the homes of bold-faced names such as Stephen Spielberg, Beyonce and Jay-Z, Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie, and architect extraordinaire, Lord Norman Foster. We caught up with Carini in his studio in Tribeca, located in a former Art Deco-designed bank, to learn more of his trade.

Wickham Boyle: How did you get started?
Joe Carini: Honestly, I became fascinated with carpets at an early age; my grandmother had some marvelous rugs in a sunroom on which I delightedly traced the patterns with my trucks. Later, I went to Pratt to study painting. During art school, I got interested in buying and selling rare and collectible carpets.

When buying and selling antique carpets at high prices, you…

View original post 1,346 more words

STORM SANDY SALVAGED OAK BECOMES TIMBER FRAME HOME

http://https://vimeo.com/122190885

timberframe salvaged storm sandy woodWhen sandy blew thru the Hudson Valley in 2012 a few 100 year oaks parted way with the earth. Julien and I had to mill them up for timber in our new addition. We called in Johnny who worked them down the hillside with his bob cat. Then he transported them to an Amish neighbor who milled them for us. Next we mortised and tenoned the frame. In this movie you see the gable end wall going up. ( 30 feet long 18 ft high) We assembled the wall down on saw horses and then let the sill plate down to skids. We dragged the whole wall within two feet of position. Then we stood it up with a come a long from the existing bathroom ridge.

What we learned: The Amish do amazing mill work. Any person who uses the kitschy word sustainability must study the Amish.

We learned that old tree’s absorbed minerals from the earth and deposit it in there checks to prevent disease. We had gorgeous green cooper deposits in the wood.

We learned old Toyota pick up trucks make for good demolition.

We learned mortise and tenon joinery is a pleasure  in green oak.

https://vimeo.com/122190885

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑