Wooden Boat Repair, Restoration & refinishing for the rest of us. NEW YORK

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Lots of wooden boat owners can not afford the major refit option here in New York. Many of us realize that plugging away in Martha Stewart style is the way to go. Some of us keep lists with structure being the priority. Not to many, plunk money in the cushions and varnish while ignoring bleeding fasteners, broken ribs and cheesy looking planks. Every wooden boat owner has a plan and we often stick to it.

Urbanboatworks ( thats us Julien & dana) is honored and pleased to keep these New York Wooden boats alive & sailing. Check us out at www.urbanboatworks.com if your in need of help and live in New York or CT.

 

Spring Varnish

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Brightwork is finiky work.   As an offshore sailor who is pretty rough and tumble, I consider my varnish protection first, perfection second. As a wooden boat owner I am aware not only of the movement of the wood on the boat but also the area’s that take the abuse. Therefor I do things like coat all rounds and surfaces that lay flat to the sun several times. A typical cabinside will get two or three coats on the waterways and eyebrows- to one coat on the horizontal grained cabin wood. Some places will get three cost while others will get one.

Here are a few tricks I have learned over the years that make it a but easier.

  • Clean your surface ( after Sanding ) 3 times. Once with a vacuum, then with a rag with spirits on it and lastly with a fresh tack rag.

I use to tell the people that worked with me doing brightwork in the tropics ” it is all about cleaning” and i would tell my clients “your paying for more then a seasonal coat. Your also getting a complete wash down to your openings including screens, tiles and walls. ”

  • Wait until the pollen has passed and there is no wind

Everyone is in a rush to get evrything knocked off there list for boat season. It pays to do your brightwork on the perfect day with no wind, early in the morning but not so early that dew is around.

  • Always buy and use a new brush.

I now charge one new brush to each job for the last coat. After someone has spent good money on sanding and cleaning they should not have a problem paying 12-18 bucks extra for a new brush, with no dust.

varnish

brightwork on an S- Class Boat

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varnish hatch

varnish on an alden hatch

Hand Made Clothes of days ago

Hand Made Clothes of Days ago. Not many people do it today. Hand spin, hand-loom, hand knit, hand weave, hand stitch and hand dye one’s own clothes. Imagine the time and patience involved. I love hand-made clothes and hand stitch some clothes when I can. But to do the whole process must be daunting. It takes me a whole winter to card and spin 15 big blobs of wool or one whole sheep fleece. I can not imagine weaving and then sewing it into a garment.

       Khadi is hand spun and woven in one’s own home. It is amazingly durable cotton that i wear spring, summer, winter and fall. Its keeps you cool and warm because of the air that is trapped into the cotton when hand spun. You can’t get this on a machine spun cotton. I love the variegation or slubs ( short cotton staples or sheep hair chunks) that is found in humble home spun textiles. My wool has plenty of them. In fact I strive for that chunky than skinny look in my wool. The khadi I am selling in my shop is hand loomed and hand spun in india. more and more kids are leaving the villages to work in the city and less and less khadi is being made. Many Khadi producers have no one to teach the skill to. 

broadfall pantsBroad fall Pants are buttoned in the front with a wide flap. They also have suspender buttons. They are comfortable and are still made by the Amish. www.gohnbrothers.comLinen coat. williamsburg va

hand made sweater sleave vestHandmade wool vest with sweater sleeves sewn in.

Hand made Hat- Williamsburg vaYour typical sleeping cap worm on a cool day in the shop.

hand made coatHand spun and loomed fabric like this is tough and durable. A true inheritable piece of clothing. Found in Colonial Williamsburg.

sticheshand stitching.

colonial pants

colonial coat

colonial jacket1800’s hand made clothes found in Shelburn Nova Scotia.

colonial jacket detail a heart appliqué on a revelotionary actor’s jacket.

mystic seaport clothingMystic Seaport attire.

hand loomed khadiAn Indian in Khadi Kurta and Dhoti.

Some one has to be wearing hand made’s in that crowd!

Natural Dyed Cashmere. Wool & Silk

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natural lac dye

lac dye pot

pure lac dye

natural dye colors

dye master book

natural dye wool

Natural dye samples

dyers tea room - nepal

dyers field

lac samples

green natural dyed wool

sample rugs

indian gods on weavers wall

new york show room

carinilang samples

The colors of natural dyes can not be beat. As a novice dyer of wool and cotton, I am astounded by the color combinations that the Indian and Tibetans can achieve. My brothers knowledge of color and old recipes have created his to die for collection of rugs. Sure its in the design but the craftsmanship and quality have to be there also. You will not see that in many manufactures of rugs today. His carpets truly have SOUL. visit www.carinilang.com for the real story.

Varnishing Wooden Boats in New York

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varnish, brightwork

at urbanboatworks we restore and refinish all matters of wood. On land or sea.

As  owner’s of a wooden boat, Julien & I understand varnish and the stable surface that needs to exist below the varnish. We address the under lying cause of varnish failure. ( caulk seam gone bad, bad bung, leaking port lights, not enough build up) When perfection is not required, we know how to lay on for protection. Prepping and painting wooden hulls – cold molded, plank on frame or strip construction is our pleasure. We work with Awlgrip, Kirby Paints and Fine Paints of Europe. Varnish is always Epifanes.

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varnishing Allegro an s class boat

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brightwork on an S- Class Boat

varnish on an alden hatch

varnish on an alden hatch

door varnish

epifanes matte varnish to a west village New York Door

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Paint on Hope a q class wooden boat

Late fall is always a time for me to work on my own boat. The build up on TIGER MARU was thick. It had been 8 years since the last strip. I use an  inferred heater to strip large surfaces. The build up was thick but it only took a half hour to strip the cabin sides. Next I cabinet scraper the wood back to a uniform red color. If not done properly yellow oxidized wood will remain. The scraper ( when sharp) levels the wood out to an even plane. When the sun hits the varnish the rays will bounce off. If the surface is not fair then the rays will absorb into the wood. After the scraping I check to make sure everything is fair. You can run your hand over the surface with your eyes closed. I promise you will feel divits, high and low spots. Scrape away until it feels even. Then I sand with 150-180 to make sure all marks are out. Next comes the varnish which is played on across the grain and thinned for the first 3 coats. This ensures all the pores are filled. Full strength varnish is played on and sanded back with 320 sand paper until the build up looks right. Round eyebrows and the top of coamings gets more coats and is sanded back with a 400 grit sponge.

A cheap skates guide for extracting a 50 foot wooden mast

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removing a wooden mast DSCF1843 DSCF1844 DSCF1846 DSCF1848 DSCF1854DSCF1857

although our 5o foot wooden mast is springy and 500 pounds, that doesn’t stop my dear darling from pulling it from a floating dock in the wake infested Hudson River with a 30 foot derrick made of repurposed 2 by 8’s.

here are the steps:
spend 5 hours making a wooden frame derrick from 2 by 8’s. cross bracing made from 2 by 6’s.

next bring to the site and bolt together the two half’s.

Then stand it up with the halyards of the mast. guy lines going back- tied and fastened to the dock. we borrowed a power winch for the lifting operation. We mounted the winch on the bottom cross brace and used a lift line for the mast which the winch cable was tied to. The cable was not long enough to go thru the block and back down. When we were ready with the set up we then unpinned all the rigging. Jay worked the winch while we guided the mast.

It was nerve wracking to say the least- as our wooden mast is very slinky. Motor boat wakes didn’t not help.

at one point when the mast was nearly out of the deck we had some troubles. The dock was under water and the derrick was lifting off the dock. Julien and I were so hyper focused that we did not notice the halyard was still attacked to the pulpit. Thank god Etna was around and saw the trouble.

Out and down the mast came.
It was a really good experience but i begged julien to find a crane to put the newly varnish mast back. And that he did. Steve with a crane on a barge came to the rescue. It was slick as snot and I did not have to worry about people knocking there teeth out or losing a months pay due to injury. After all Julien is batting about a 600 as he has dropped it twice and broken it once under sail.

IF YOU ARE INNEED OF PROPER MAST REMOVAL, WOOD ROT ,REPAIR & VARNISH  HEAD TO WWW.URBANBOATWORKS.COM

Hardware on New boom Boom Staves Assembled Wooden Spar Construction Wooden Boom Building

Dinner Guest- Joe Carini

Wicky is a true crafts lady in her writing and in living life. Joe my brother is an artist in all walks of life- his rugs are amazingly alive! wwww.carinilang.com

Wickham Boyle: Writer, Blogger, Dreamer and all around capable person

*published in Aspire Metro Magazine on 29 July 2015

Sought after for their artistic design, elegant materials and traditional hand weaving methods rarely utilized in modern carpet making, Carini Lang’s carpets grace the homes of bold-faced names such as Stephen Spielberg, Beyonce and Jay-Z, Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie, and architect extraordinaire, Lord Norman Foster. We caught up with Carini in his studio in Tribeca, located in a former Art Deco-designed bank, to learn more of his trade.

Wickham Boyle: How did you get started?
Joe Carini: Honestly, I became fascinated with carpets at an early age; my grandmother had some marvelous rugs in a sunroom on which I delightedly traced the patterns with my trucks. Later, I went to Pratt to study painting. During art school, I got interested in buying and selling rare and collectible carpets.

When buying and selling antique carpets at high prices, you…

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